Mozzle

Mozzle
luck, especially bad luck (Hebrew 'mazzal' = luck; which word also appears in 'shemozzle')

Dictionary of Australian slang . 2013.

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  • mozzle — /ˈmɒzəl/ (say mozuhl) noun luck, especially bad luck: * And how much do you stand to lose, if your mozzle is out? –joseph furphy, 1903. {Hebrew mazzal luck; compare shemozzle} …  

  • mozzle — Australian Slang luck, especially bad luck (Hebrew mazzal = luck; which word also appears in shemozzle ) …   English dialects glossary

  • mozzle — n. luck, mazal (Hebrew) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • mozzle — mozzˈle noun Luck, esp bad luck • • • Main Entry: ↑moz …   Useful english dictionary

  • Nury Vittachi — (born 2 October 1958 in Ceylon) is a journalist and author based in Hong Kong. His columns are published daily, weekly in a variety of newspapers in Asia as well as on his website. He is best known for the comedy crime novel series The Feng Shui… …   Wikipedia

  • Nury Vittachi — 2009 in Frankfurt am Main Nury Vittachi (* 2. Oktober 1958) ist ein in Ceylon (heute Sri Lanka) geborener asiatischer Schriftsteller und Journalist. Vittachi schreibt in englischer Sprache. Vittachi lebt heute mit Frau und drei adoptierten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Vittachi — Nury Vittachi (* 2. Oktober 1958) ist ein in Ceylon (heute Sri Lanka) geborener asiatischer Schriftsteller und Journalist. Vittachi schreibt in englischer Sprache. Vittachi lebt heute mit Frau und drei adoptierten Kindern im Hongkong.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Put the mozz on — jinx (someone); cause (someone) to have bad luck (short for mozzle ) …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • put the mozz on — Australian Slang jinx (someone); cause (someone) to have bad luck (short for mozzle ) …   English dialects glossary

  • mozzer — n luck, good fortune. This seems to be the main surviving variant among many words ( mozz , mozzle , mozzy ) deriving from the Yiddish mazel: a cookie blessing the consumer with good luck. The words have existed in British working class speech… …   Contemporary slang

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